Updated: Berry cuts the ribbon on state-of-the-art animal science building on Friday. It is part of a $30 million-plus community investment in 2021.

Updated: Berry cuts the ribbon on state-of-the-art animal science building on Friday. It is part of a $30 million-plus community investment in 2021.

 

 

A ribbon cutting was held Friday, Oct. 22, for the new animal science building on the Berry College campus  Pictured from left to right are: Chair of the Berry College Board of Trustees Rick Gilbert; Vice Chair Bert Clark; Trustee Randy Berry; Trustee Fred Tharpe; Berry College President Stephen Briggs; Brenda Briggs;
Dean of the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences Alice Suroviec; and Provost Mary Boyd. 

It was part of the official dedication of Berry College’s new state-of-the-art animal science building. Housing the college’s largest and most distinctive major, the 23,000-square-foot facility will enhance teaching and research in animal health and production, including genetics, microbiology and physiology.

Photo by Brant Sanderlin/Berry College


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In context: It has been a busy year for Berry College with the $15.7 million animal science building now in use starting this fall and the Fairfield Inn & Suites — 80 hotel rooms adjacent to the Rome Tennis Center at Berry College, valued at $12 million — due to open in late November or early December. Add to that the purchase and renovation of what is now known as Oak Hill Residences for students and you’re looking at a total community investment of more than $30 million.

Media release: Berry College’s new $15.7 million state-of-the-art animal science building, funded entirely by donor support, opened its doors this fall to students.

“The animal science major has been a nationally recognized, top-performing program for many years,” said Berry College President Steve Briggs, “and this remarkable facility provides a home that is comparable in excellence. With help from many friends and partners, we are excited to see how our students will work with faculty in the laboratories and specialized teaching areas to prepare for careers and leadership roles in animal-related industries. We know that great spaces inspire great performances.”

With animal science being the largest and most distinctive major at Berry, the 23,000-square-foot facility enhances teaching and research in animal health and production, including genetics, microbiology, and physiology.

Built as an addition to McAllister Hall, home to Berry’s School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences, the facility is in close proximity to students and faculty in other majors. This will encourage collaboration across the sciences in areas such as “One Health,” an emerging focus involving researchers in a variety of fields including biology, biochemistry, mathematics and animal science.

Dr. Sheila Allen, former dean of the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine, serves on Berry’s Board of Trustees. She is also senior accreditation advisor for the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges.

“I first became familiar with Berry during my tenure as a faculty member and dean of the University of Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine…The academic preparation of these students is exceptional – a product of years of 1-to-1 interaction with Berry faculty – but what really sets them apart is their work ethic. They have obviously learned by doing through the many work experiences available at Berry’s animal facilities.”

Success has fueled 187% growth in program enrollment since 2004, making animal science Berry’s largest major. Animal science students gain hands-on experience with a variety of livestock while working in the college’s large-animal facilities and pastures. Access to the Berry herds allows students to study production processes and agribusiness, which is a growing field at Berry College.

Animal Science stats (numbers accurate as of 2019):

  • Two tracks: pre-veterinary/pre-professional and production/management.
  • 98% vet school acceptance rate for students with a 3.3 GPA or higher since 2009.
  • 171 veterinary school acceptances since 2009, an average of 17 per year.
  • Approximately 100 students employed annually in animal science-related on-campus work positions.
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