Updated: Another week of “high” level flu activity in Georgia. Hardest hit age group so far: 18 through 49. New reporting from Georgia Health News.

Updated: Another week of “high” level flu activity in Georgia. Hardest hit age group so far: 18 through 49. New reporting from Georgia Health News.

 

The latest reports continue to show a high level of flu activity in the state, based on Georgia Department of Health data. So far, 88 people have been hospitalized in the metro area for the illness.

Most are in 18-49 age group, or 30 in all. Thirteen others were 50-64 and 18 were 65 and older. Ten patients were between newborn and 4, and 17 others were ages 5 through 17, the latest data shows (week ending Nov. 23).

In addition, there were a total of 3,774 visits for influenza-like illness for the week ending Nov. 23. No flu-related deaths so far this season. You can view the complete report here. For tips on prevention, please click here.

Overall, Georgia’s flu cases are labeled as “regional” while border states Alabama and South Carolina are now classified as widespread.

By Andy Miller, Georgia Health News:

Flu activity is high in seven Southern states, including Georgia, according to the CDC.

The state’s Department of Public Health reported that 5.31 percent of Georgia outpatient visits were reported as influenza-like illnesses during the week ending Nov. 23. That percentage has steadily climbed since the flu season began.

Nancy Nydam, a Public Health spokeswoman, told GHN on Tuesday that “it’s too early’’ to characterize this flu season in comparison to previous ones. She added that the flu caseload so far is “what we’d expect for this time of year.’’

The agency said 19 people were hospitalized for flu in metro Atlanta during the week ending Nov. 23, bringing the season total to 88. There have been no deaths yet reported this flu season in Georgia.

The other states seeing high influenza activity are Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas. The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is also reporting high levels.

States with high flu activity are in red and dark orange.

 

Children under age 5, people who are 65 or older, and those with compromised immune systems or chronic medical conditions are most at risk for flu complications.

Shane

Dr. Andi Shane, medical director of hospital epidemiology at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, said Tuesday that Children’s facilities have seen an increase in children with respiratory illnesses, including influenza B, over the past few weeks.

Respiratory illnesses can be prevented by practicing hand hygiene, including frequent handwashing, especially during the busy holiday season, she said. Another part of hand hygiene is to avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

“If you or your family is experiencing symptoms, stay home from school, work or social events for at least 24 hours of fever-free time without taking fever-reducing medications,’’ Shane added.

Public Health officials said it’s very important for people who have not yet received a flu shot to do it now.

“The holidays are a few weeks off, and it takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against influenza,’’ said Nydam of Public Health.

The CDC says the exact timing and duration of flu seasons can vary, but influenza activity often begins to increase in October. Most of the time, flu activity peaks between December and February, although it can last as late as May.

More than half of Americans remain unvaccinated as flu season is under way, according to a survey from NORC at the University of Chicago.

The survey found as of early November, 44 percent of adults reported that they had received a flu vaccination. Another 18 percent had not yet been vaccinated but said they intended to get a vaccination this season.

And 37 percent of adults surveyed said they did not intend to get a flu shot this season.

CNN reported Tuesday that the illness appears to be hitting Louisiana especially hard.

Children’s Hospital New Orleans has seen more than 1,400 cases of the flu so far this season, compared to nine cases at this time last year, CNN said.

At Ochsner Health Systems, the largest nonprofit health system in Louisiana, there were 6,909 cases of the flu in November. That’s 1,385 percent more cases than it saw in November 2018.

Shane, of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, emphasized that “it’s never too late to get a flu shot, which offers the best form of protection from both influenza A and B viruses.”

 

 


HARBIN CLINIC WELLNESS TIPS:

  • Get a flu shot to protect yourself from this year’s flu virus strains. It’s your best defense against the flu.
  • Wash your hands often for at least 20 seconds with warm water and soap
  • ​Cover your mouth if you cough or sneeze
  • If you feel sick, wear a facemask to help prevent germs from spreading
  • When sick, stay home to avoid exposing others
  • Please click for additional information.

FLU-RELATED RESTRICTIONS:

Floyd Medical Center, Polk Medical Center and Cherokee Medical Center are restricting visitors to decrease the chances of patients and hospital staff catching the flu and other contagious illnesses. The restrictions include:

  • No visitors other than immediate family members or other people approved by the patient.
  • No visitors younger than 13.
  • No visitors with flu-like symptoms, which include cough, sore throat, fever, chills, aches, runny or stuffy nose and vomiting or diarrhea.
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