Politics: Busy week with Floyd GOP Women meeting Tuesday, Tillman Hangar rally on Saturday. Rome City Commission qualifying starts Aug. 19.

Politics: Busy week with Floyd GOP Women meeting Tuesday, Tillman Hangar rally on Saturday. Rome City Commission qualifying starts Aug. 19.

Tuesday: The Floyd County Republican Women Meeting is at the Red Lobster on Shorter Avenue. Lunch begins at 11:30 a.m. and the meeting starts at noon. The guest speaker is U.S. Rep. Tom Graves.

Saturday: The Floyd County Republican Party’s annual Tillman Hangar Rally. Set for 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., the event is billed as “the largest annual Republican rally in North Georgia.” It will feature speakers from local, state and federal officials. The Trump Bus is scheduled to stop by as well. What to watch for: Clues about who is and isn’t running in 2020, including incumbents and challengers; we’re hearing a surprise or two already. The schedule: Doors open at 10 a.m. with a catered barbecue lunch available for purchase starting at 10:30 a.m. The event begins at 11. Admission is free.Tables will be available for conservative organizations for a donation.

  • Tillman Hangar speakers include Chris Carr, Georgia Attorney General; a series of national and state Trump supporters; state Republican leaders; area legislative members; and local elected officials. Expanded details

Aug. 19-23. Qualifying for six openings on the Rome City Commission. Six of nine seats are on the ballot, three from Ward 1 and three from Ward 3. Qualifying is daily from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 19-22 and until 4:30 p.m. on Aug. 23 at City Hall. Those seats up for election: Ward 1 incumbents Bill Irmscher, Milton Slack and Sundai Stevenson. Ward 3 incumbents Bill Collins, Craig McDaniel and Evie McNiece. The top three vote-getters in each ward will get the seats.

  • About this election: Some remember when a recent election was canceled as just enough candidates qualified to fill the seats on the City Commission. We won’t have that problem this year even if any incumbents chose to retire. The past two years have been a bit rocky for a commission that tries to present itself as unified (it isn’t; check that recent mayor vote). Some of the issues: Downtown in general, including parking, smoking and so-so reaction to events designed to attract people to Broad Street; the vote to finance six indoor courts at the tennis center at more than $4 million; approval of a fourth tax allocation district for the city, this one for the East Bend development expected to rise at the old Kmart site; economic development overall, from the chamber decision to relatively no action on several SPLOST-fund inducements to attract new industry.
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