Buzz: Robert Stevenson Memorial Concert returns Saturday, Aug. 3, with an all-star line-up. Busy Monday for Floyd County School Board. Author of ‘Smokelore,’ a barbecuer’s bible, to speak July 25.

Buzz: Robert Stevenson Memorial Concert returns Saturday, Aug. 3, with an all-star line-up. Busy Monday for Floyd County School Board. Author of ‘Smokelore,’ a barbecuer’s bible, to speak July 25.

Stellar Award Winners Doc McKenzie & The Hi-Lites and Lisa Knowles & The Brown Singers headline the Robert Stevenson Memorial Concert on Saturday, Aug. 3, at the Rome City Auditorium. Also performing will be The Gospel Legends, Slim’s Supreme Angels and Darrell McFadden & the Disciples.
Doors open at 5 p.m. Tickets are $30 each and are available at the Rome Kroger and online. For additional information call 706.235.2065.
Robert Stevenson was a longtime radio personality as well as gospel music announcer and a legendary gospel music promoter who died on Jan. 15, 2018. The annual concert continues as a memorial to him as well as a celebration.

Busy Monday for the school board: The Floyd County Board of Education will have its third and final public hearing for the 2019 Millage rate at 7:30 a.m. Monday, July 15, followed by our regular monthly board meeting.  Caucus will be at 8 a.m. and the board meeting at 8:30.  All will be held in the superintendent’s office.

Love barbecue? This guy wrote a book on it: On July 25 at 6:30 p.m. at the Bartow History Museum, retired AJC journalist and author with Bartow County connections, Jim Auchmutey, will discuss his book, Smokelore: A Short History of Barbecue in America, published recently by the University of Georgia Press. According to Auchmutey, “My central contention is that barbecue, not apple pie or anything else, is the most truly American food because it’s so intertwined with our history and represents us as a people with roots on four continents and a variety of cultures.”

Auchmutey’s own history is rooted in BBQ with both his grandfather and great-grandfather being noted pitmasters in Bartow County. He wrote about them in a column for the ArtsATL website where he shared that his grandfather, who once served as a firefighter in Cartersville, participated in barbecues around the area.  After the Saturday Evening Post mentioned him several times in an article focusing on Southern barbecue, his popularity grew.  He found himself cooking for others as far away as Chicago. It appears this passion for BBQ has trickled down through the years.

Auchmutey’s presentation includes many entertaining visuals and some recorded music.  “If you love BBQ or history, this is a program you won’t want to miss,” says Trey Gaines, Museum Director.  “While Auchmutey will not be able to discuss everything in his book, we think it will whet your appetite, leaving you wanting to know more.”  Thanks to Scott’s Walk-up Bar-B-Q of Cartersville, participants will be able to sample local BBQ. A lite BBQ meal will be provided at 6:30 p.m.

This program is free for members and included in the price of admission to the museum for non-members. Tickets are available at www.BartowHistoryMuseum.org.  A book signing will follow the presentation.


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