Updated with audio interview with Secretary of State’s Office on the investigation into Floyd County’s ballot issue.

Updated with audio interview with Secretary of State’s Office on the investigation into Floyd County’s ballot issue.


ON RADIO: Candice Broce of the Secretary of State’s Office joined us on Thursday’s Hometown Headlines Radio Edition on WRGA 98.7 FM to discuss the Floyd County ballot issue. Please click the above file to hear that interview.


The Georgia Secretary of State’s office has opened an investigation into the ballot errors found by local voters during absentee, advance and primary day voting.

The investigation falls under the category of “improper distribution of voters,” says Press Secretary Candice Broce.

At issue: The Floyd County Board of Education races were included on some city ballots (Rome has its own school board and school system). There was ample signage at advance voting stations  about the ballot error, cautioning city voters to not cast a ballot in the county school board elections.

In reality, those votes were moot anyway. Board members Chip Hood and Tony Daniel earned new terms after no one qualified to run against them in the Republican primary or fall general election.

Among the reasons for the delay in announcing Floyd County election results on Tuesday was the separation of any “wrong” votes from the totals reported to the Secretary of State’s Office. Results were available around 11:10 p.m. Tuesday and Floyd was among the last of Georgia’s 159 counties to report results.

So what happens next:

Broce says the office has “dedicated law enforcement officers” who will investigate exactly what happened any why. The normal procedure is to conduct the investigation, talk to people involved and others in the voting process and review the overall handling of the issue.

Once concluded, the case will go to the State Elections Board for consideration. Board members will then decide whether to dismiss the claim, whether to basically send letters of reprimand to those involved ordering them not to repeat such procedures or, in some cases, bound the case over the state Attorney General’s office for administrative review.

 

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